Cryptocurrency Hash Utils

Cryptographic hash algorithms

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SHA3-256 (Secure Hash Algorithm 3)

SHA-3 (Secure Hash Algorithm 3) is the latest member of the Secure Hash Algorithm family of standards, released by NIST on August 5, 2015.[4][5] Although part of the same series of standards, SHA-3 is internally different from the MD5-like structure of SHA-1 and SHA-2. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-3

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SHA-256 (Secure Hash Algorithm)

SHA-2 (Secure Hash Algorithm 2) is a set of cryptographic hash functions designed by the United States National Security Agency (NSA).[3] They are built using the Merkle–Damgård structure, from a one-way compression function itself built using the Davies–Meyer structure from a (classified) specialized block cipher. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-2

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SHA3-512 (Secure Hash Algorithm 3)

SHA-3 (Secure Hash Algorithm 3) is the latest member of the Secure Hash Algorithm family of standards, released by NIST on August 5, 2015.[4][5] Although part of the same series of standards, SHA-3 is internally different from the MD5-like structure of SHA-1 and SHA-2. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SHA-3

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RIPEMD160(RIPE Message Digest)

RIPEMD (RIPE Message Digest) is a family of cryptographic hash functions developed in 1992 (the original RIPEMD) and 1996 (other variants). There are five functions in the family: RIPEMD, RIPEMD-128, RIPEMD-160, RIPEMD-256, and RIPEMD-320, of which RIPEMD-160 is the most common. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIPEMD

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MD5

The MD5 message-digest algorithm is a widely used hash function producing a 128-bit hash value. Although MD5 was initially designed to be used as a cryptographic hash function, it has been found to suffer from extensive vulnerabilities. It can still be used as a checksum to verify data integrity, but only against unintentional corruption. It remains suitable for other non-cryptographic purposes, for example for determining the partition for a particular key in a partitioned database.[3] @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MD5

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Hexadecimal

In mathematics and computing, hexadecimal (also base 16, or hex) is a positional system that represents numbers using a base of 16. Unlike the common way of representing numbers with ten symbols, it uses sixteen distinct symbols, most often the symbols "0"–"9" to represent values zero to nine, and "A"–"F" (or alternatively "a"–"f") to represent values ten to fifteen. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hexadecimal

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Base58 Encode

Base58 is a group of binary-to-text encoding schemes used to represent large integers as alphanumeric text, introduced by Satoshi Nakamoto for use with Bitcoin.[1] It has since been applied to other cryptocurrencies and applications. It is similar to Base64 but has been modified to avoid both non-alphanumeric characters and letters which might look ambiguous when printed. It is therefore designed for human users who manually enter the data, copying from some visual source, but also allows easy copy and paste because a double-click will usually select the whole string. Compared with Base64, the following similar-looking letters are omitted: 0 (zero), O (capital o), I (capital i) and l (lower case L) as well as the non-alphanumeric characters + (plus) and / (slash). In contrast with Base64, the digits of the encoding do not line up well with byte boundaries of the original data. For this reason, the method is well-suited to encode large integers, but not designed to encode longer portions of binary data. The actual order of letters in the alphabet depends on the application, which is the reason why the term “Base58” alone is not enough to fully describe the format. A variant, Base56, excludes 1 (one) and o (lowercase o) compared with Base 58. @Source https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Base58

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Benefits of attending this cryptocurrency course are listed below:
  • Complete ownership of your public and private keys for Bitcoin and Ethereum cryptocurrencies.
  • Complete ownership of the source codes to create private keys — open-source software.
  • Understand how the addresses are created step by step (with a simplified language) without depending on external parties such as companies providing software wallets or cold wallets also named as cold storage.
  • You will be able to encrypt your private keys and store them in a safe place without the need to share anywhere, which provides you the opportunity to send some cryptocurrency to your offline address and store it for many years in a safe location.
  • You don't need to depend on anyone apart from following this course — which is simplified and based on open-source software — while creating your cold/paper wallets.
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